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10 Comments

  1. Trisha Fullmer

    Thank you for writing this up!
    As a mom of a cancer kiddo- it’s almost the same do’s and don’ts.
    Mom has to answer for the kid.
    I really hated how good friends stopped texting cause they didn’t know what to say.
    I hated how quiet people got.
    But it boosted my confidence and now I can’t shut up 🙂

    Reply
    • Rebecca Moore

      Trisha,
      I’m so sorry to hear that your kiddo is sick. I’m praying for his or her swift recovery.
      And how wonderful that you now know how to encourage others!

      Reply
  2. Barbara

    When I was scary sick, my church and homeschool community rallied around us. Brought us dinner and groceries, mowed our lawn and, most importantly, drive my children to where they needed to be. One family took my children home with them whenever I was in the hospital. It helped me immensely to know my 12 and 15 year olds were not home alone and scared.

    Reply
    • Rebecca Moore

      Barbara,
      It really is amazing to feel so loved and supported by others during difficult times–such a gift from God. I’m so glad you experienced that!

      Reply
  3. Kathleen

    Great list. I was very sick last winter, in the hospital for almost a month. I agree with all of it and especially that it’s important to reach out and not have any expectations about receiving a response. I loved everyone’s messages but often was so tired and feeling so horribly I wasn’t able to respond for a while. My cousin just lost his young son to cancer and I tried to explicitly say this when I reached out to them: “No need to respond to this – I just want you to know how much we love you.” And I’m always touched these days when, 5 months later, friends ask how I’m feeling, how my recovery is going, etc. On the outside I look pretty good but my chronic illness is still a big presence in my life.

    Reply
    • Rebecca Moore

      Kathleen,
      So glad you can resonate! And how amazing that you are able to now effectively help others who are sick.

      Reply
  4. Kay salehi

    Thank you so much for giving loving words on how to be there for a cancer patient. I beat cancer once but you never feel free. Just live life with new veiw.

    Reply
    • Rebecca Moore

      Kay,
      Thank you for your kind comment! And so glad you are cancer-free! 🙂

      Reply
  5. Paula

    Thank you! I love the question examples you gave, besides how are you feeling. When my son was sick, I got tired of people asking how we were doing, because I knew it wasn’t a quick answer.
    I really appreciated the times people came, even if they had nothing to say. They just didn’t want us to be alone during one of his surgeries or waiting on scan results.

    Reply
    • Rebecca Moore

      Paula,
      Yes, it is so difficult to answer those generic questions. I’m glad you can relate and that you have supportive friends who were willing to simply be with you! 🙂

      Reply

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