Personal finance 101 – saving for your kids’ college

avatar
About Tsh

Tsh is the founder of this blog and lives in Bend, Oregon with her husband and 3 kids. Her latest book is Notes From a Blue Bike, and believes a passport is one of the world's greatest textbooks.

This is the sixth part in my series on Dave Ramsey’s Baby Steps, a proven personal financial plan. My goal is to explain a really solid money management plan in plain ol’ English, for intelligent yet financially “average” home managers.

college.jpg
Photo by arnoldo

O
nce you start funding 15% of your income towards retirement, and once you’ve fully funded your Emergency Fund (and any other big purchases you’re saving for – like a Car Replacement Fund), it’s time to start funding your kids’ future education.

This does not mean you can now afford to save up for the most expensive private school out there, nor does it mean your chid doesn’t need to contribute personally towards his future. But it does mean you are financially free enough to provide at least some towards a college education – at least a start towards entering university life debt-free (and hopefully staying that way).

Here are the nuts and bolts of Baby Step #5 in Dave Ramsey’s plan – put money towards your children’s college fund.

Dave’s Rules for College

These are pretty straightforward:

1. Pay cash. The average college student today graduates with about $15,000 in student loan debt after spending 3-4 years in an apartment. What a heavy weight strapped to a graduate’s shoulders fresh out in the job market! If you’re able to help your child avoid that burden, then do so.

2. And If you have the cash or the scholarship, go. As in, to college.

Student loans are so normal these days; there’s a prevailing myth that you can’t possibly go to a university without them. But they’re just not worth it. Even with the low interest rate most federal student loans have, you just never know what the future holds. I know I’d hate to corner my kids into having to pay for their education after they’ve received it. What if they’re offered some really great opportunity after graduation that pays very little (or not at all), yet is invaluable to their career or overall well-being? What if they want to settle down and become a wife and mom right away? These things would be so much harder to do with student loan debt.

Dave says this:

“If you’ve planned your savings goals and don’t have much room in the budget for college, don’t panic. Knowledge is just part of the formula to success. With what you are able to save, those precious kids can probably get a good degree if they will suffer through lifestyle adjustments and get a job while in school. Work is good for them.”

I wholeheartedly agree. I worked part-time all through college, and while I hated it at the time, I can look back and see the enormous life and business lessons I learned from those long shifts waiting tables. These life lessons are just as much a gift as the money you contribute to your kiddo’s education. Consider giving them that valuable experience.

piggybank2.jpg
Photo by s2photo

Where to Save the Money

Dave recommends putting college tuition funds in either an Educational Savings Account (ESA) or a 529, which are state plans and therefore different depending on your state of residence. College tuition goes up faster than regular inflation – 7 percent for college versus 4 percent for most everything else. This means that in order to keep up with tuition rates, you’ll need to earn at least 7 percent per year to keep up with the tuition increases.

With an ESA funded in a growth-stock mutual fund, your money will grow tax-free when it’s used for higher education. You can currently invest $2,000 per year, per child in an ESA (if you make under $200K a year) – and if that ESA averages 12 percent, you’ll have $126,000 in tax-free education funds by the time they’re ready for college.

If you make more than $200,000, or for some reason you want to contribute more than $2,000 a year (possibly the case if your kids are older than 8), then 529s are for you. There are lots of different 529 types out there, but Dave only recommends a “flexible” plan. He says you could pick from virtually any mutual fund in the American Funds Group or Vanguard or Fidelity and probably be okay.

Application Time

How this applies to you depends on your circumstances.

• If you don’t have kids, it doesn’t apply to you at all because you can’t open ESAs or 529s for people who don’t exist. But seeing as this is Simple Mom, I’m guessing most of my readers are parents.

• If you you’re not debt-free (Baby Step #2), you don’t have three to six month’s of expenses in savings (Baby Step #3), and you haven’t started contributing towards your retirement (Baby Step #4), then you’re not ready to start saving for your kids’ college. Under Dave Ramsey’s plan, you’d hold off contributing to your kids’ college fund until you completed the previous Baby Steps.

This makes sense – why would you save for your kids’ education and not your retirement? In doing so, you’re strapping your kids down with having to take care of their parents down the road. I’d rather not do that and have them work for part of their college funding.

• If you are at the stage of saving for your kids’ college, then Dave recommends sticking to mutual funds through an ESA or 529. And do what you can afford without feeling guilty if you can’t fully fund their education. That’s never been part of the definition of a good parent.

kidsmoney.jpg
Photo by snowdeal

Our Personal Plan

As of now, our plan when we’re at Baby Step #5 is to provide a “matching promise” for our kids – we’ll match whatever they’re able to save, up to what an ESA allows at the time. And if they don’t have enough saved by the time they’re ready for college, we will highly encourage them to not take out student loans. They’re just not worth it.

I’ll end with another quote from Dave:

“Regardless of how you save for college, do it. Saving for college ensures that a legacy of debt is not passed down your family tree. Sadly, most people graduating from college right now are deeply in debt before they start. If you start early or save aggressively, your child will not be one of them”

Missed other parts of my series?

  1. Dave Ramsey’s Financial Plan
  2. The $1k Baby Emergency Fund
  3. The Debt Snowball
  4. The Fully-Funded Emergency Fund
  5. Investing for Retirement
  6. Pay Off Your Home Mortgage
  7. Live Like No One Else
Join the Conversation

Subscribe For Free!

Like reading this post?
Get more delivered to your email inbox.

Comments

  1. ugh.. it all sounds so great but unfortunately right now we’re in the middle of accumulating a massive amount of student loan debt in order for my hubby to finish school! how will we EVER get to this step? maybe in 7-8 years?!?!?….

    Katies last blog post..break

  2. I know it seems overwhelming, Katie. I felt completely lost and in over my head with projecting future finances – until all this Dave Ramsey stuff. I feel so much more at peace about it now. 7-8 years, in light of an entire life, is really no big deal. Ya know?

  3. avatar
    Jessica says:

    Yay for more fab-o advice on money matters! This college savings advice is so valuable. We don’t have kids yet, but I love learning lessons as to be prepared for the day… My parents & grandparents blessed me with enough money to take care of 2 yrs, and I did the rest, graduating with just a very small loan (that I paid off just months after graduating). And then I got married… And we are now on a 5 year plan to kill my hubs’ hefty college loans. And now I know how to advice the college students that come my way, “Run as FAST as you can AWAY from SallieMae!!”

  4. Amen to that, Jessica! I love what Dave says on his show – kick the old woman out of the spare bedroom.

  5. Your site is not right up my blog’s alley but it presents a wonderful byway for my readers !
    Added your cute image-link with the tennies…

    ~ Alex

    Alexander M Zoltais last blog post..The Value of Pain

  6. Hi!
    This was a great post…thanks for sharing! I am just now hearing of Dave Ramsey and have had his book, Total Money Makeover, out from the library…I need to get it out again! It’s so encouraging to know that we are not oddballs and others believe in being debt free! Yay! :) Have a great one!

    Karis last blog post..What DOESN’T Work For Me

  7. @Kari – Long live debt-freedom! Glad to have you here.

  8. One comment on the student loans. DO go ahead & apply. When I started college my mom was still a SAHM (for my younger brother) so we were living on one (comparatively small) income. I qualified for a loan that was interest free for the entire time I was in college. We happily took the loan & earned interest on that money for the 4 years I was in college. The plan was to pay it off when I graduated (w/ that money that had been earning interest) but since dh & I were buying a house we opted to keep the school loan (at a very low interest rate) and put that money toward our house down payment.

    Sweetpeass last blog post..In Everything Give Thanks

  9. Great article Ma’am….very inspiring…scholarship is also not a bad idea

    Moby’s last blog post…Hispanic College Fund (HCF): Scholarship for Hispanic

  10. Great article and great blog overall! It’s inspiring to see someone with the financial discipline to be plan for necessities and emergencies. Hopefully many people will find the specific information about interest rates and savings vehicles to be especially helpful since, too often, these things are spoken about in a vague sense that isn’t applicable to many individuals.
    WashingtonSavingsBank´s latest post: ¿Qué cámara me compro si

  11. avatar
    Linda Bland says:

    This my first time on visiting this web-site; I was only searching things were coming to my mind. I am the grandparent of a 3 month old baby girl, and her brother is 2 1/2 months old. This information is very helpful for me. I only heard a few words on tv about a 529 plan, now I am more knowledgeable.
    Thank you so much for the knowledge and wisdom God has blessed you to share with others.

  12. avatar
    kenneth parkar says:

    Hello Admin,
    Being the official contributor of world best “Debt Community” site i won’t stop myself to congratulate you for maintaining such an informative & professional (http://theartofsimple.net) site. If you will allow me then i want to be the part of your domain by contributing one relevant finance article by keeping your site guidelines. The article will be Free with one back link of my relevant domain & Also you will get link back from my quality finance sites instead of posting my content !!!!

    You can share your desire content topics to follow & will also get the editorial rights to moderate the article as per your requirements.

    If this sounds interesting & logical then feel free to reply me.

    Looking forward to work with you.
    Good regards,
    Kenneth

Trackbacks

  1. [...] Money Management in Marriage Real Life Example of Why You Need an Emergency Fund Gen Xers, Ys: Are We a Bunch of Spendthrifts? Ten Things You Must Carry in Your Purse or Wallet Saving For Your Kids’ College [...]

  2. [...] know more financial stuff. Before my introduction to Dave Ramsey, Roth IRAs, escrow, mutual funds, ESAs and 529s, and even sinking funds were really confusing. But because he targets the average American with [...]

  3. [...] Personal Finance 101 – Saving for your Kids’ College [...]

  4. [...] simple mom talks about her plan to save for her children’s college. She has a great grasp of the whole [...]

Speak Your Mind

*

CommentLuv badge